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Sharp electronic organizers with the IC card slot (Wizard OZ/IQ/PA/PI series)
05-26-2021, 12:10 AM
Post: #41
RE: Sharp electronic organizers with the IC card slot (Wizard OZ/IQ/PA/PI series)
Here are three out of four modifications of the original Japanese organizer PA-7000 (starting from the top-left):
- the original variant of the PA-7000B (B means 'Black' color of the cover)
- updated PA-7000B with added 'Bware' branding and re-positioned Sharp logo
- PA-7000-GY (Grey) with the redesign

The fourth variant available is the red version of the original PA-7000B - PA-7000R.

[Image: IMG-5161.jpg]

[Image: IMG-5162.jpg]

[Image: IMG-4427.jpg]

[Image: IMG-4428.jpg]

[Image: IMG-4430.jpg]
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05-31-2021, 05:35 PM (This post was last modified: 05-31-2021 09:18 PM by Akuji.)
Post: #42
RE: Sharp electronic organizers with the IC card slot (Wizard OZ/IQ/PA/PI series)
One of the six game-cards published by Sharp in the west was OZ/IQ-8A01 'Organizer Hatris.' It was another game based on the original Japanese card (the same as Box Jokey, Organizer Tetris & Organizer Golf) - PA-5C01(S). The Japanese card was the first software IC card released for the high-resolution display of the new top-of-the-line PA-9500 organizer (the device was released in Oct/90, while the game card - in Dec/90).

OZ/IQ-8A01 was released later on for the new OZ/IQ-8000 line of western organizers with the widescreen display. However, the western version differs from the Japanese one in two ways:
- it requires a user to hold the organizer vertically (the same way as for the Organizer Tetris card)
- it has less detailed graphics (at least for the falling hats)

Here's the comparison between the cards:

[Image: PA-5-C01-1.jpg]

[Image: PA-5-C01-2.jpg]

[Image: IQ-8A01.jpg]

[Image: IQ-8-A01-2.jpg]
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06-05-2021, 10:04 PM
Post: #43
RE: Sharp electronic organizers with the IC card slot (Wizard OZ/IQ/PA/PI series)
Okay, this may be OT for this particular thread;
I bought a Sharp EL-5520 this morning at a Habitat for Humanity Re-Store ($2).
After battery replacement, basic calculator functions are working.
I haven't tried any BASIC to it.
It has a 4Kb RAM Card (CE-211M) installed. I am not sure whether it is working.

10B, 10BII, 12C, 14B, 15C, 16C, 17B, 18C, 19BII, 20b, 22, 29C, 35, 38G, 39G, 41CV, 48G, 97
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06-07-2021, 01:55 PM
Post: #44
RE: Sharp electronic organizers with the IC card slot (Wizard OZ/IQ/PA/PI series)
I finally tracked down a Tetris card for my OZ-7200. It plays well enough, considering the constraints. What I find interesting is that the game doesn't speed up, rather the height of the floor increases with each level, forcing you to work higher up the stack. They obviously did this because fast-moving pieces would have ghosted badly enough that they would have been invisible.

(06-05-2021 10:04 PM)Ren Wrote:  Okay, this may be OT for this particular thread;
I bought a Sharp EL-5520 this morning at a Habitat for Humanity Re-Store ($2).
After battery replacement, basic calculator functions are working.
I haven't tried any BASIC to it.
It has a 4Kb RAM Card (CE-211M) installed. I am not sure whether it is working.

That model requires a RAM card to be installed, as it doesn't have any internal memory, so if the device appears to be working at all, it's probably good. To test, I'd suggest hitting the reset button on the back of the computer, switching to BASIC mode, and typing MEM to see how many bytes it reports.

Also, I should apparently stop by the local Re-Store if they sell things like that. Smile
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06-10-2021, 11:01 PM
Post: #45
RE: Sharp electronic organizers with the IC card slot (Wizard OZ/IQ/PA/PI series)
In today's slightly off-topic post, I want to talk about Sharp's competitors in Japan. Despite the company's leading position in its home market, it has had quite a few of them. Here are the most notable three of them.

First on the list is Sharp's longtime "rival" and the main competitor - Casio. The pioneer of the digital organizer back in 1983, the company was caught off guard when Sharp released PA-7000 in January 1987. Only after six months, Casio released the DK-1000 organizer, capable of displaying kanji, but it did not have the competitor's IC card slot.

It wasn't until mid-1989 when the company was able to counter-attack with the release of the Casio DK-5000. It had a widescreen display capable of displaying almost twice as much information as the then-current Sharp PA-8500; it also had twice as much memory and, finally, an IC card slot hidden inside the device. The organizer was equipped with five dedicated buttons below the screen to operate the card. Each of them was responsible for a particular function depending on a specific card. In this case, the bottom line on the screen displayed the five buttons' descriptions, which slightly reduced its usable area but was a justified solution.

[Image: Casio1.jpg]

[Image: Casio2.jpg]

The company released about ten organizer models, some of which were subsequently adapted to Western markets as part of the SF line. I also have a DK-7200 (unfortunately, it doesn't turn on) and one of the later models - DK-E810. It is notable thanks to the inclusion of EPROM memory in addition to the RAM memory. The organizer automatically copied contents of the RAM into EPROM to back up the data from loss in case both the primary and backup batteries die.

[Image: Casio3.jpg]

[Image: Casio4.jpg]

As for the IC cards, their assortment is much smaller compared to Sharp's offerings and totals just over 50 items, including Japanese and Western variants. Casio produced new card models until 1996, when Sharp was already actively adopting the software distribution for Zaurus/PI PDAs via floppy disks or online networks.

[Image: Casio5.jpg]

The next competitor is the NEC PI-ET1, introduced in August 1990. As some of you probably know, at the time, NEC was the leader in the Japanese personal computer market, and its PC-98 family was a standard like the PC XT/AT in the West. Seeing the success of Sharp in the personal organizers market, NEC decided to develop its own solution. It teamed up with Hudson Soft, which already helped the company design the PC Engine game console (TurboGrafx-16 in the US). Hudson Soft created firmware for the device, official development tools, and one of the few game IC cards.

[Image: Nec1.jpg]

[Image: Nec2.jpg]

The PI-ET1 itself had many attractive features: a Z80 processor that was well-known to developers, a barcode scanner, a dedicated 4-directional pad with two buttons for menu navigation, and convenient game controls (hello, Game Boy). Software-wise, it had a built-in human face editor, which could be used to assign a simple avatar to a phone or address book record. Japanese hackers quickly found a way to write assembly language programs directly on the device itself without buying official development tools.

[Image: Nec3.jpg]

Unlike personal computers, NEC could not gain a foothold in the organizer market, and the PI-ET1 did not have a successor. As a result, only 11 IC cards were produced, four of which were gaming cards. Since I don't have any of them, I'm including someone else's photo below. As you can see, the cards were about half the size of the Sharp and Casio counterparts.

[Image: nec4.png]
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06-10-2021, 11:02 PM (This post was last modified: 06-11-2021 10:10 AM by Akuji.)
Post: #46
RE: Sharp electronic organizers with the IC card slot (Wizard OZ/IQ/PA/PI series)
(had to split up the post due to the number of pictures)

Rounding out the top three competitors is the Kyocera Refalo, released at the end of 1990. As a basis for the original PA-7000 organizer with its IC card slot, Sharp took paper diaries a-la Filofax, which allowed organizing internal space by adding different pages out of dozens and hundreds of types. Unlike its competitors, Kyocera decided to combine paper and electronic organizers as closely as possible. Its Refalo externally looks like a hard "cover," with a touch screen and control buttons on the left side and two expansion card slots on the right. In the center of the organizer, there is a standard 'binder' connector mechanism for the addition of paper sheets. However, the company's engineers went even further: two of these rings are pins of an induction interface that allows one to connect peripherals wirelessly. My organizer has a horizontal QWERTY keyboard; there is also a vertical ABCD keyboard available in the wild.

[Image: Kyocera1.jpg]

[Image: Kyocera2.jpg]

[Image: Kyocera3.jpg]

The unit itself has an x86-compatible processor and runs on full MS-DOS with a custom shell designed for touchscreen operation. Kyocera initiated the creation of a new IC card standard based on the well-established Japanese JEIDA v4 memory card standard (compatible with PCMCIA), to which dozens of software and digital content manufacturers, including Microsoft, have joined. The company's idea was that ICMA cards could be used in other manufacturers' devices and contain software, books, and other media types.

[Image: Kyocera4.jpg]

[Image: Kyocera5.jpg]

Unfortunately, the Refalo is powered by a special lead-acid battery, which is dead in my case. The device can be powered by a 5V power supply, which I have yet to find (the organizer came to me a few days ago). Therefore, I can not verify whether it turns on and demonstrate the interface.

As for the IC cards, I do not know their complete list, as there is almost no information about Refalo available online. I have a card with Lotus 1-2-3. Similar to NEC, Kyocera's organizer was not popular in Japan, and the company had to abandon the already announced plans for its expansion to the West.

[Image: Kyocera6.jpg]
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06-16-2021, 10:58 AM
Post: #47
RE: Sharp electronic organizers with the IC card slot (Wizard OZ/IQ/PA/PI series)
Red beauties - PA-7000-R and PA-7550-RD. Sharp decided to go even further with the red version of the PA-7500 organizer and give it a redesign and its own model number.

[Image: IMG-5506.jpg]

[Image: IMG-5507.jpg]

[Image: IMG-5508.jpg]

[Image: IMG-5509.jpg]

[Image: IMG-5510.jpg]

[Image: IMG-5511.jpg]

[Image: IMG-5512.jpg]

[Image: IMG-5513.jpg]
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06-17-2021, 02:39 AM
Post: #48
RE: Sharp electronic organizers with the IC card slot (Wizard OZ/IQ/PA/PI series)
(06-07-2021 01:55 PM)Dave Britten Wrote:  [...]
(06-05-2021 10:04 PM)Ren Wrote:  Okay, this may be OT for this particular thread;
I bought a Sharp EL-5520 this morning at a Habitat for Humanity Re-Store ($2).
After battery replacement, basic calculator functions are working.
I haven't tried any BASIC to it.
It has a 4Kb RAM Card (CE-211M) installed. I am not sure whether it is working.

That model requires a RAM card to be installed, as it doesn't have any internal memory, so if the device appears to be working at all, it's probably good. To test, I'd suggest hitting the reset button on the back of the computer, switching to BASIC mode, and typing MEM to see how many bytes it reports.

Also, I should apparently stop by the local Re-Store if they sell things like that. Smile

It reports 3070
Thanks for replying to my question Dave!
Did I mention I received a used Panasonic HHC as a wedding gift? B^)

10B, 10BII, 12C, 14B, 15C, 16C, 17B, 18C, 19BII, 20b, 22, 29C, 35, 38G, 39G, 41CV, 48G, 97
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07-06-2021, 08:47 PM
Post: #49
RE: Sharp electronic organizers with the IC card slot (Wizard OZ/IQ/PA/PI series)
I decided to mess a little and created a short user guide in English for the Japanese organizer PA-7000, based on the Japanese pocket guide that comes with the device. It covers only the basics and is not meant to be a complete user manual. The guide may also be relevant for later models.
I would like to thank Dave Britten for the help.

The Google Docs link (contains minor formatting errors due to incorrect import of the original document from MS Word): https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-iFW...x8kMIsWAs/

PDF version: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1mXPRZe7...okNRu/view
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07-19-2021, 10:53 AM
Post: #50
RE: Sharp electronic organizers with the IC card slot (Wizard OZ/IQ/PA/PI series)
Although Sharp originally developed the IC card format for its portable organizers, the company later used it for other devices. One of these was "word processor," a portable electronic typewriter with extended functionality, often with an integrated printer. Many Sharp Shoin word processors (WD series) had an IC card slot and could communicate directly with the PA/PI series of electronic organizers. Besides memory expansion, additional fonts, programs, and games were distributed on IC cards for the Shoin processors.

[Image: image.png]

For the sake of interest, I purchased one IC card for the Shoin, the WD-10GF, which contains a semi-cursive calligraphic Kanji print font. The box is very large and is more like a videotape box.

[Image: 1.jpg]

[Image: 2.jpg]

A foam pad takes up most of the inner space. Additionally, it contains a thin manual, a warranty card, and the IC card itself.

[Image: 3.jpg]

WD-10GF in comparison with the PA-7C10 organizer IC card.

[Image: 4.jpg]

[Image: 5.jpg]

Finally, let's compare the size of the cards' packaging.

[Image: 6.jpg]

The PA-7C10 was chosen for a reason. As I mentioned above, the Shoin word processors, in addition to their main function, had extra features, including a scheduler, calendar, etc. As a result, it was possible to exchange data between a processor and an organizer and directly edit the information contained on the portable device. Moreover, a number of organizer cards could be used in Shoin, including PA-7C10 "Phone/Address Book Card." Finally, some word processor models allowed developing BASIC programs for portable organizers with the appropriate software installed; the app could then be transferred to suitable organizer cards like the PA-7C18/7C-19.

[Image: 7.jpg]
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