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National Semiconductor NS-7100
10-21-2021, 10:55 PM
Post: #1
National Semiconductor NS-7100
Hi all.

It would have been fascinating to see and use a 7100.

Since it’s only now a memory, what HP and TI calculators would be equivalent?
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10-22-2021, 04:53 AM
Post: #2
RE: National Semiconductor NS-7100
At the time? Nothing. The HP-41C and its successors would meet and exceed the '7100 but not until the summer of 1979. Fortunately, you can find pointers to images and more in the museum here at:https://www.hpmuseum.org/cgi-sys/cgiwrap/hpmuseum/archv021.cgi?read=258185 .

No, I've still not been able to get to my photographic slides from that memorable evening in 1977. Sorry!

So many signals, so little bandwidth!
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10-22-2021, 05:51 PM
Post: #3
RE: National Semiconductor NS-7100
No slides?! No problem. Thanks for the link.
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10-23-2021, 01:22 PM
Post: #4
RE: National Semiconductor NS-7100
Some more information in French

http://www.silicium.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=33389

Charles Sippl discusses that machine briefly in his book "Programmable calculators: How to use them"

Felix
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10-23-2021, 06:50 PM
Post: #5
RE: National Semiconductor NS-7100
I have not been able to find a definite reason why National Semiconductor (NS) cancelled the project. Non-volatile memory in hand held calculators was cutting edge technology in 1976. The worlds first programmable calculator with non-volatile memory, the HP-25C, was only introduced in Jul 1976 so perhaps NS was having technical issues. I suspect it was more likely due to the drop in calculator pricing that was occurring during this time. When NS started this project, high end programmable calculators were still very expensive, the HP-65 was selling for almost $800. At an introductory price of $300 the NS-7100 with its advanced features would have been very attractive and profitable. By the time 1977 rolled around, prices for these advanced models was dropping rapidly. The TI-58 introduced in July 1977 had twice the memory, software modules and a lot more functions for only about $125. This was probably the nail in the coffin for the NS-7100.
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10-23-2021, 09:22 PM
Post: #6
RE: National Semiconductor NS-7100
(10-23-2021 06:50 PM)Steve Simpkin Wrote:  By the time 1977 rolled around, prices for these advanced models was dropping rapidly. The TI-58 introduced in July 1977 had twice the memory, software modules and a lot more functions for only about $125. This was probably the nail in the coffin for the NS-7100.

Yes. That time even had a name: "The Great Calculator Wars" There was a big shakeout of companies such as NS and Lloyd.

Tom L
Cui bono?
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10-24-2021, 12:09 AM
Post: #7
RE: National Semiconductor NS-7100
(10-23-2021 09:22 PM)toml_12953 Wrote:  
(10-23-2021 06:50 PM)Steve Simpkin Wrote:  By the time 1977 rolled around, prices for these advanced models was dropping rapidly. The TI-58 introduced in July 1977 had twice the memory, software modules and a lot more functions for only about $125. This was probably the nail in the coffin for the NS-7100.

Yes. That time even had a name: "The Great Calculator Wars" There was a big shakeout of companies such as NS and Lloyd.

Ah, yes. I remember those times well. I was a bit late to the game as I spent a fair amount of 1974 trying to persuade my mom that getting a calculator would not ruin my ability to do math with a pencil and paper. I finally won out and have been obsessed with them ever since. Here is one of my favorite descriptions of the development of the pocket calculator.
http://www.vintagecalculators.com/html/t..._race.html
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